By Emerald Horizon on Jul 22, 2014

Bamboo Rocks the House

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Growing trends in eco-friendly living indicate bamboo is a progressively popular option for greenies. Bamboo is an alternative plant that may be used to create everything from bath towels to flooring, and can be integrated into nearly any area of your life.

 

WHY BAMBOO IS ECO-FRIENDLY

Deforestation has created problems across different areas of the world that can take decades to reverse. Deforested areas experience a devastating domino effect, as they leave plants at higher risk for exposure to plant disease, forcing increased use of pesticides. Further, deforestation contributes to soil loss and erosion, as well as devastation to the water cycle.

“In short, trees help regulate our climate, water cycle, soil and entire ecosystem,” writes Bambooki. “The increased use of bamboo can help or solve a majority of these issues.”

How so, you ask?

Fully mature hardwood requires 30 to 50 years to mature, whereas bamboo moves ten times faster, maturing in three to five years. Bamboo not only thrives and grows in different parts of the world, but several species can grow four feet in a single day.

Bamboo is also naturally hardy. They are so durable that you don’t even need to use pesticides or chemicals to protect them from pests and encourage growth, and they don’t suck up as much water as trees do. Best of all – wait for it – bamboo products decompose into naturally reusable, nutrient-rich compost.

 

H2 – BAMBOO FLOORING

Thinking of some home renovations and updates? Bamboo flooring is a great option if you want to green your home and strengthen your floors. Bamboo is 13 percent harder than maple flooring, and 27 percent harder than northern red oak. What this translates to is durable floors that last longer and can take beatings traditional hardwood floors couldn’t possibly dream up. Furthermore, these floors are “naturally resistant to water, mildew, and insects.” And because bamboo grows so quickly, they’re quite sustainable in comparison to the traditional wood selections as well.

 

BAMBOO CLOTHING

I’m chuckling as I write this because, in a way, I feel like discussing bamboo is akin to that deodorant commercial where they say it’s “Strong enough for a man, but made for a woman.” Bamboo is clearly not a gender-oriented material; however, it’s nearly as strong or as soft as you need it to be within specific functions it’s designed for. I’ve already addressed bamboo flooring – which is marvelous and gorgeous if done right, by the way – and now I’m going to talk about clothing. Yes, clothing, because bamboo is versatile enough for clothing also.

Bamboo is unbelievably soft and comfortable. Your bamboo T-shirt is much more luxurious and cozy than a plain cotton one, and your bamboo sweater can hold a candle against those of the cashmere variety. But that’s not all!

Bamboo is anti-bacterial, anti-static and moisture wicking. What does this mean for you? Your clothes won’t stink or cling, and whenever you sweat, the fabric pulls moisture away from the body. Bamboo also holds a superior level of breathability in all types of weather, and it also cuts 98 percent of harmful UV exposure to skin, making it perfect for traveling.

Have I also mentioned that bamboo is pretty awesome for highly sensitive skin? You can purchase bamboo T-shirts, skirts, dresses, casualwear and fitness apparel. They even have bamboo diapers if you wanted to buy them.

 

BAMBOO HOUSEWARE  

I could go on and on forever (have you read my previous posts?!) but my editors have told me to stop rambling and wrap it up. Putting it simply, bamboo has been applied to a bunch of different technologies and used to create a variety of things. I won’t get into super details, but you can buy plenty of things made of bamboo for your home. There’s bamboo cookware utensils, bamboo bath carpets and area rugs, bamboo picture frames, bamboo bedding, bamboo furniture … you name it, and if it’s been made with wood, or linen of some sort, there’s a possibility there’s a bamboo-based alternative for it as well.

 

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Comments

  1. Sally J. Sheldon says

    I love how you point out the versatility of bamboo! It can be used in so many different ways, I will look for it more in anything I buy. Thank you for such an informative article. :)

  2. Wendy says

    I have heard that Bamboo needs excessive amounts of water and chemicals to be softened for clothing. Do you know how this waste is stored and/or re-used?

  3. fernando mabini says

    Hi Emerald! Whatever is your gender you are as intriguing as your subject Bamboo. In the Philippines we grow some many varieties of bamboo. what would fit you suggestion for the utilization of bamboo as substitute for wood is a variety we locally call “tambo”. the diameter can be as wide as one foot over and the grain is thick as one inch over. in some parts of the country processing this into lumber, flooring materials and een furnitures is already being done although using crude machines. can you refer me to a firm that offers machine that processes bamboo into the products I described above? my emal: sledjr@gmail.com Thank yu

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