By Lori Brown on Mar 30, 2010

Shareholders Could Drive Starbucks' Recycling Advancements

Advertisement


58 billion paper cups are thrown away (not recycled) every year. According to the Environmental Defense Fund, 20 million trees are cut down in the process of manufacturing paper cups and we could power 53,000 homes with the energy we consume through our paper cup consumption. Photo: Flickr/JoshSemans

According to the Environmental Defense Fund, 20 million trees are cut down in the process of manufacturing paper cups, which could be used to power 53,000 homes with the energy used through our paper cup consumption. Photo: Flickr/JoshSemans

Though recycling was not a major focus of Starbucks’ annual shareholder meeting last week in Seattle, 11 percent of shareholders made it clear that they wanted to see increased recycling efforts, leading many to question the coffee giant’s future plans on this topic.

The recycling measure (proposal 3 on the proxy) expectedly did not pass, but it did spark the idea of increased influence shareholders have on company environmental initiatives, specifically recycling.

But what’s all the fuss about Starbucks’ and their coffee cups anyway? The answer is two-fold.

First, the sheer volume – 3 billion paper coffee cups sold each year in the U.S. market alone – makes for a tremendous amount of waste associated with that daily coffee habit of consumers.

Secondly, the material makeup of the cups makes for difficult recycling. Though the cups are made of paper, a thin plastic coating is used to make them impermeable. Thin as this layer may be, it makes the cup unable to be recycled with either the paper or the plastic stream.

Throw in the plastic top and the cardboard sleeves, and you have a mixed materials nightmare for recycling streams.

As You Sow, an organization dedicated to using shareholder leverage to transform corporate behavior, was the driving force behind the recycling proposal in last week’s meeting.

The foundation found the coffee giant a failure on its 2008 U.S. Beverage Container Recycling Scorecard and Report, which ranked beverage companies based on source reduction, recycled content, recovery and recycling and transparency.

Though the recycling proposal wasn’t passed at last week’s annual meeting, Starbucks has still made it clear that the company is working on its environmental initiatives.

Starbucks currently uses 10 percent post-consumer recycled fiber content in their cups and has committed to making its paper cups 100 percent recyclable by 2012. The company also features cups in certain parts of the country that are recyclable and compostable and is looking to expand that footprint.

Starbucks is working alongside the U.S. Conference of Mayors to understand the recycling barriers with the cups in an effort to ensure consumers have access to recycling opportunities.

In addition, Starbucks is currently preparing for its second annual Cup Summit. In response to its commitment to make its entire stock of coffee cups recyclable by 2012, Starbucks held the first-ever summit in Seattle last year, bringing together cup manufacturers, paper recyclers and employees among others to discuss the viability of cup recycling.

The company also recently launched “the betacup challenge, an online contest to engage creative thinkers in solving the disposable cup waste problem through open collaboration. Ideas can be submitted on how to reduce paper cup consumption, with $20,000 worth of cash prizes being awarded for the most innovative ideas.

“Given the complexity of the disposable cup waste issue, we need a broad range of stakeholders to become involved in finding solutions,” said Jim Hanna, Starbucks Director of Environmental Impact.

“In addition to working with local municipal governments, materials suppliers and cup manufacturers to improve recycling infrastructures, we believe in harnessing the creativity of environmentally conscious individuals to identify new alternatives.”

Read more
Starbucks Takes Recycling to a Whole New Local Level
Starbucks Pilots Coffee Cup Recycling Program
Starbucks Holds Summit on Recyclability of Cups

Advertisement


Related articles

The best picks from all our categories, ready for you to read instantly.

ECO-PRODUCTS

The newest and guilt free products that will help save the enviornment.

      Comments

      1. says

        Great reference to some of the challenges that confront national chains with both mixed materials on disposables that adversely effects successful recycling efforts along with unique requirements within different local regions. We have found that successful recycling efforts combine user education, easy collection systems and good pro-active communication with local waste disposal and recycling companies.

        Ken Goldberg * Business & Product Development * Ex-Cell Kaiser LLC * 11240 Melrose Ave. Franklin Park, IL 60131-1340 * P- 847-451-0451 ext 120 * F- 847-451-0458 * E- kgoldberg@ex-cell.com

      Leave a Reply