By Mary Mazzoni on Sep 30, 2013

Artists Reimagine Waste from San Francisco Dump

The materials used in these two works of art were scavenged from the Public Disposal Area at Recology San Francisco, a.k.a., the San Francisco Dump. Left: Jeff Hantman, Tries, Try, 2013, Plywood, veneer, Masonite, latex house paint, and colored pencil, 41 x 46 x 15 in., Courtesy of Recology San Francisco. Right: Lauren DiCioccio, Baseball, 2011, Hand-embroidery on felt, canvas, thread, 4 x 4 x 4 in., Courtesy of the artist and Jack Fisher Gallery.

The materials used in these two works of art were scavenged from the Public Disposal Area at Recology San Francisco, a.k.a. the San Francisco Dump. Left: Jeff Hantman, Tries, Try, 2013; plywood, veneer, Masonite, latex house paint, colored pencil, 41 x 46 x 15 in.; courtesy of Recology San Francisco. Right: Lauren DiCioccio, Baseball, 2011; hand-embroidery on felt, canvas, thread, 4 x 4 x 4 in.; courtesy of the artist and Jack Fisher Gallery.

The idea of artists using recyclable material in their work is nothing new. But a group of California art students is taking the concept one step further by foraging through waste at Recology’s Public Disposal Area — otherwise known as the San Francisco dump — to recover materials for their art.

On display until early 2014, the Reduce, Reuse and Re-Imagine exhibition at Santa Clara University called on artists and art students to rescue items that were disposed of as trash — rather than recycled by local residents and businesses — for their medium.

Made possible by a grant from SCU’s Sustainable Resource Initiative, the exhibit includes works in a variety of materials, ranging from recycled wood to discarded clothing.

At the show, you’ll catch works from nine well-known artists — including former Recology Artist in Residence Jeff Hantman and esteemed paper artist Lauren DiCioccio — whose work will be featured alongside pieces made by 12 students from the university.

“Together, these artists explore new ways of thinking about art and the environment; their work encourages us to make positive, sustainable changes in our everyday lives and in our communities,” the official exhibit description reads.

Catch the show for free at the de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University until Dec. 6, 2013, and then again from Jan. 10 through Feb. 2, 2014.

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