A Few Reasons to Show Some Love for Bugs

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Do a typical search on “insects” on an environmental website and you’ll mostly get results about green options to keep the buggers away.

But there are reasons why we should have a little more compassion for our tiny fellow earth-dwellers (even if you are a New Yorker fighting the bed bug plague!).

Researchers from the University of Florida recently found that termites may be used for biofuel. Photo: Flickr/fortes

Believe it or not, there are many ways in which insects can be beneficial to humans, even beyond biological pest control and honeybee pollination.

Medical advances

According to Science Daily, an ingredient, chlorotoxin, in the “deathstalker” scorpion’s venom can slow the spread of brain cancer. In tests on lab mice, University of Washington (UW) researchers demonstrated that nanoparticles of iron oxide in combination with the venom could cut the spread of cancerous cells by 98 percent, compared to 45 percent for the scorpion venom alone.

Another article reports that chlorotoxin could help gene therapy become an effective treatment for glioma, the most common and serious form of brain cancer. A study by the same UW researchers demonstrated that the substance allows therapeutic genes, which treat disease, to reach more brain cancer cells than current approaches.

Biofuel creation

University of Florida researchers have identified two enzymes termites use to break down wood for food, which may lead to an easier, faster and cheaper way to convert plant material to ethanol.

The enzymes could be used towards creating cellulosic ethanol, which is typically composed of wood chips, switchgrass or corncobs, and may have up to 85 percent lower carbon dioxide emissions than gasoline.

Composting companions

If you’ve always wanted to try composting but don’t have the space for a large-scale operation, vermiculture might be for you. Worm compost is simple: it’s made in a container filled with moistened bedding and redworms.

All you have to do is add food waste and the worms, which are surface feeders, will convert it into compost. Vermicomposting can be done year-round and indoors, including in homes, offices and schools. The process is non-intensive, odorless and a great soil conditioner for houseplants and gardens both!

Painkiller alternative

Back to the scorpion venom! Researchers at Tel Aviv University are investigating ways to develop a novel painkiller from peptide toxins in Israeli yellow scorpion venom that would be highly effective (and less addictive than morphine) without side effects.

The research is based on knowledge that the natural venom compounds interact with sodium channels in nervous and muscular systems, some of which communicate pain.

If you find the idea of these painkillers hard to stomach, don’t worry. The painkillers would use chemically engineered derivatives that mimic the scorpion toxins, not the real thing.

In the past, scientists have also created pesticides from scorpion venom that harm insects like locusts without affecting beneficial ones like honeybees.

Biological antifreeze

University of Alaska scientists have identified an antifreeze molecule, called xylomannan and composed of a sugar and fatty acid, in a freeze-tolerant Alaska beetle. The beetle is able to survive temperatures below minus 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

These molecules may help freeze-tolerant organisms survive by preventing ice crystals from forming or penetrating lethally into cells.

Plastic Breakdown

Good news for the great outdoors! Mealworm beetles have been found to possess bacteria in their digestive tracts that can help decompose often-discarded expanded polystyrene.

Now if we could only find a great use for all of those cockroaches and bed bugs!

Related articles
I Got Worms! Composting and You
Scientists Test Pesticides Made From Scorpion Venom
Beetle Bacteria Can Break Down Polystyrene Foam

  • Sally

    …”hidden in the brains and neural tissues of these insects [cockroaches and locusts], British researchers have found at least nine molecules that are toxic to bacteria. In fact, the molecules were able to kill more than 90 percent of the meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria in the lab.”

  • Linda A.

    As with many other things, when it comes to bugs, there are good ones and bad. Gee! Who knew that termites could actually be GOOD for anything! Ladybugs are good (an all-natural pesticide). They’re a rose gardener’s best friend because they love to eat aphids, the bane of rose gardeners. “Cockaroaches” are bad. EWWW!!! Honeybees are very, very, VERY good. Here’s hoping that CCD (Colony Collapse Disorder, which wipes out honeybees) can be permanently eradicated. Are ants, hornets, mosquitoes, and wasps good for anything, other than being merely pests, and mosquitoes being disease carriers. (BTW, worms are NOT bugs.)

  • Rita

    When there is life, should the life have some rights to continue to live; even when it does not benefit humans? And why?