Just When We Thought Industry Wouldn’t Self Regulate…

Just when we thought industry wouldn’t self regulate…

Just when we thought industry wouldn’t self regulate…

Over the years the demand for better and more reliable rechargeable batteries has skyrocketed along with our need for portable power to charge the plethora of digital lifelines now attached to our hip. While many advancements have been made in the devices we use, and the rechargeable battery that powers them, a growing problem emerges. What do we do with the batteries when they have finally given up the ghost or been superseded by that newest piece of kit we simply had to have?

When we consider the size of the problem, even plastic water bottle numbers are left in the dust. We may all use a bottle a day, but more than likely we use at least three batteries a day and generally think nothing of hurling them into the trash when they die or we replace them.

So what do we do with them? Well thanks to a group of forward thinking industry leaders, who decided to fix the problem their products could potentially create, gave birth to Call2Recycle® a not-for-profit program funded by battery and product manufacturers to show their commitment to responsible recycling, and to do their part as best they can to reduce the amount of heavy metals dumped into the waste stream and discourage others from doing so. Now, skip forward 20 years, and we can see their efforts are paying off and the fledgling program started so long ago has now been embraced by both the U.S. and Canada and provides more than 34,000 locations and recycling sites throughout North America, …talk about the little engine that did.

Operating independent of any battery industry trade associations and with the guidance of a Board of Directors, Call2Recycle’s structure and mission allows it to focus on stewardship and education.  “The organization operates through the lens of end consumers as opposed to through the lens of the industry,“ says Call2Recycle CEO & President Carl Smith.

Collect The Batteries